Stargardt’s Sufferer Uses eSight To See Mother’s Face

Learn how eSight 4 helped Tony see new opportunities.

Tony Babb is a family man with a powerful story. Tony has always lived with Stargardt’s disease, but it wasn’t until he was in his early 20s that his vision started to impact his life. Today, Tony’s visual acuity is 20/300.

I could no longer see my mother’s face, and that bothered me. – Tony

At the time, Tony was worried that sight loss could affect the rest of his life in terms of getting a job, meeting someone, having children, and being independent. 

But Tony’s ambitious personality persevered, and he led a successful career in sales while selling jewellery on the side. As Tony says, “I realized I had to rely on myself.

Seeing for the First Time in 38 Years

Captured in an emotional YouTube video, Tony Babb was able to see for the first time in 38 years with the eSight 3. 

This is f*cking outstanding,” Tony murmured. 

He was able to read words on the wall from across the room and recite them confidently. He saw his girlfriend’s face for the first time, and began to tear up as he described how beautiful she was to him, and even proudly claims he could pick the dust from his beard.

Perhaps one of the most powerful moments is when he pulls up a photo of his mother and sees her face clearly for the first time in years.

Seeing New Opportunities with eSight 4

Tony has been using eSight since 2018. Now he confidently states that, “I have the same opportunities that everyone else takes for granted.” He can take his kids out for bike rides, go to his daughter’s ballet recital, and watch movies with his children. He is no longer restricted from activities that make him feel like a good father.

Tony’s Growing Independence

In his professional life, it is easier for him to do work on his laptop, use the photocopy machine, lead presentations, and so much more. He even continues his jewelry business on the side.

Tony with eSight 4 at office

With eSight, I have a certain sense of independence. I don’t have to rely on anyone else, just myself. – Tony Babb, eSight wearer

Skip to content